About your Search

20130801
20130831
SHOW
News 29
Hannity 13
( more )
STATION
FOXNEWSW 131
CNNW 82
MSNBCW 66
CSPAN 48
FOXNEWS 48
ALJAZAM 39
FBC 31
CSPAN2 25
CNN 22
MSNBC 22
LINKTV 14
CNBC 12
KGO (ABC) 12
KPIX (CBS) 12
COM 9
KQED (PBS) 8
( more )
LANGUAGE
English 623
French 1
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 624 (some duplicates have been removed)
called "the brotherhood: america's next great enemy." i think this is the number one sold on amazon.com and it is riveting to show how does organization has managed to infiltrate into various capitals throughout the western world and it has managed to come under the obama administration, metastasize and so without any further ado i would like to introduce you to a wonderful individual, erick stackelbeck. [applause] >> i want to thank you for hosting this event. i look at sera as a modern-day esther or deborah. such a time as this. thank you for having me here. if you write a book, you spend a year with that and say this book can put me through pack. but i think that people are reading it. it gets into detail about the main player in the arab spring, which i refers to as the islamist winter in the butt. the muslim brotherhood is done, out of power in egypt, we don't have to worry about them. this is the postmortem of history. it has been has the muslim brotherhood, the leaders were killed and imprisoned in the group was banned for decades. the headquarters was burned to the ground. c
and i think they writely believed that america's apparent america'sability to flinfluencee evenltsdz would be limited and it's costly to try. >> almost a year anniversary of the benghazitac. it was airstrikes on libya. that was what many are proposing now for syria, and now, it seems like the situation in libya is much worse than it was under gaddafi in certain ways. >> i think any time you get involved in a war, you cannot entirely predict the outcome. so i think there is certainly a war weariness in the u.s. but a war wariness as well. people really are worried about these sorts of things. but i do believe that the use of chemical weapons, the use of these banned weapons by this regime is something that the obama administration absolutely must react to. again, i don't think the obama administration is interested in leading the american people into a long-term war, nor does anyone in the obama administration really believe that airstrikes will somehow embolden or sustain the opposition, the rebel sources such that they could somehow march on damascus and throw assad out. so i think
. mer "america tonight" is next. >>> what happens when social media uncovers unheard, fascinating news stories? >> they share it. >> social media isn't an afterthought. america. >> al-jazeera social america community online. >> this is your outlet for those conversations >> post, upload and interact. >> every night, share undiscovered stories. >> the stream, tomorrow night, [[voiceover]] every day, events sweep across our country. and with them, a storm of views. how can you fully understand the impact unless you've heard angles you hadn't considered? antonio mora brings you smart conversation that challenges the status quo with unexpected opinions and a fresh outlook. including yours. would probably be very good at that also. that is it for al-jazeera america. >>> and welcome back. late summer heat wave has prompted many schools across the events. heat stroke is a leading cause of death among athletes, and it is a particular concern for high school football players and their parents at this time of year. one high school in georgia set up new rules after a devastating loss for their te
. my name is jonathan betz. i'm from dallas, texas, and i'm an anchor for al jazeera america. >>my name is ranjani chakraborty, i'm from houston, texas. >>i'm kim bondy. >>nicole deford. >>and i'm from new orleans. >>san francisco, california. when i was a little kid, i just really loved the news. >>news was always important in my family. >>i knew as a kid that was exactly what i wanted to do. >>i learned to read by reading the newspaper with my great-grandfather every morning. >>and i love being able to tell other people stories. >>this is it, i want to be a part of this. >>this is what really drove me to al jazeera america. [[voiceover]] every sunday night, al jazeera america presents gripping films from the world's top documentary directors. >>thank god i didn't suffer what he had to go through. next sunday, the premiere of google and the world brain. >>this is the opportunity of our generation. [[voiceover]] it would be the world's greatest library under one digital roof. but at what cost? >>google could hold the whole world hostage. [[voiceover]] al jazeera america presents google
hand hand-out. >> awesome. >> taxpayers. >> so are all the hand-outs killing what made america great? good old fashioned hardwork? plus selling us out. government agencies making money off the private and the personal info. you won't believe what we found. and the opener of america's oldest brewery taking on big labor in a big way. and the reason job seekers on this holiday weekend. "cashin' in," working hard for you starts right now. ♪ ♪ >> eric: hi, everyone, i'm eric bolling. welcome to "cashin' in." the crew this week, wayne rogers, jonathan hoenig, michelle field, ebony k. williams. welcome, everybody. as we celebrate labor day this weekend let's open up a debate about the current state of labor in america. >> work is quickly replaced with hand-out and freebies. the recent report found in 35 states, welfare pays more than the minimum wage. that alone is driving the would-be workers to the open arm of our government. happy we feel recipient is a happy voter. what is the fall-out? welfare abusers, the takers are exploding. while the labor force, the makers are imploding. more
farland, and author of the knewly released book, "the brotherhood: america's next great enemy," thank you, both, for being here. >> thank you. >> thank you. lou: kt, starting with you, the idea that the president wants to reurn, the administration wants to return to a democratically elected president, which is precisely what the egyptian people have demonstrated they want no more of after a year, think you would know more. >> well, those are not the actions anymore. the actions is can the military establish some kind of order because the option is not military againstmocracy. it's the military maybe gets a little bit of order going, or you have chaos and potentially another civil war. i thought, by the way, the introduction was great. you set up the fact that we were for the mubarak government before we were against them, and then we were for the morsi government before we against it, and for the military government before we were against it now. lou: thank you, and the with the -- the "we" referred there is a reference to the obama administration. eric, in the book, you call for a move against
will start with violence in egypt. bret stephens and peter beinart disagree as usual. >>> then, is america overregulated? does the government have altogether too much of a say in how we live our lives? i'll ask the man who put many of the obama administration's regulations in place, cass c sunstein. >>> also underneath the violence, is the arab world the new start-up society? that's what an american venture capitalist believes. and while we're at innovation, is north korea going to beat apple at its own game? obviously no, but i will explain. >>> but first, here's my take. if there is one crisis that both the american left and right agree is real, it is of declining mobility. the american dream is at heart that someone no matter his or her background can make it in this country. a few weeks ago, four economists at harvard and the university of california at berkeley released a path-breaking study of mobility within the united states. and last week, the "journal of economic perspectives" published a series of essays tackling the question from an international perspective. the research is ca
in my power to make sure this law works as it's supposed to. because in the united states of america, health insurance isn't a privilege, it's your right. and we're going to keep it that way. >> the number one concern of americans is obamacare. >> obama and the democrats have turned the american people, particularly when it comes to health care, into servants of government. >> the american people wanted health care reform because they wanted affordable care. and what we're seeing under this health care law is that the cost of care is actually going up. >> because in the united states of america, health insurance isn't a privilege, it's your right. >> there are many conservatives standing up and saying, look, obamacare is going to be a disaster for the country. >> because in the united states of america, health insurance isn't a privilege, it's your right. >> as i travel around kentucky and around the country, people come up to me and say stand firm, stand up, try to stop this monstrosity, it's going to be bad for the country. >> i can tell you there was a popular physician at my town
brotherhood. it's called "the brotherhood: america's next great enemy." i am a slow reader, but i went through read in one afternoon because i could not put it down. it is such a page turner. i think number one on amazon in terms of books about the middle east. it is reading to show how this organization that was established in 1929 has managed to infiltrate into various capital throughout the restaurant -- the western world and unfortunately into our very own. it has managed to, under the obama administration, metastasize and has been influencing power. without any further ado are like to introduce you to have wonderful individual, erick stackelbeck. [applause] >> i want to thank sarah for a first of all hosting this event and the endowment for middle east troops has such phenomenal work. i looked at sarah as a modern-day esther, deborah. i really do. such a time as this to thank god for the organization and when you're doing and think of revving a year. you don't want to look at it. i know people are reading it. this is really the first book since the so-called arab spring broke out that get
>> because in the united states of america, health insurance isn't a privilege, it's your right. >> there are many conservatives standing up and saying, look, obamacare is going to be a disaster for the country. >> because in the united states of america, health insurance isn't a privilege, it's your right. >> as i travel around kentucky and around the country, people come up to me and say stand firm, stand up, try to stop this monstrosity, it's going to be bad for the country. >> i can tell you there was a popular physician at my town hall that obamacare shouldn't go forward. >> the fast majority of the american people oppose this plan, they don't want obamacare. >> i'm going to do everything in my power to make sure this law works as it's supposed to because in the united states of america, health insurance isn't a privilege, it's your right, and we're going to keep it this way. >> apparently former congressman allan west isn't impressed about what the president said about health insurance being a right. he calls president obama, quote, a very dangerous threat to the very exis
heart. he wanted white america to see what they were doing. he wanted white america to see how hurtful it was. >> the letter was a national call to the conscience of america using real life, real time reality of birmingham as it's template. birmingham then became the spark that ignited the prairie fire of negro existence that was transformed into negro revolution. >> today thousands of people are expected to be in washington to celebrate the legacy of martin luther king jr. joining us now from a los angeles, president of the beverly hills hollywood branch naacp and member of the national board. thank you for being with us today. >> thank you for having me here, morgan. >> president obama is going to speak at the exact spot where dr. martin luther king spoke 50 years ago today. what do you hope to hear him say? >> well, i'm sure, and i hope that he will talk about the progress that we as america has made, and we as african-americans have really looked forward to in terms of being able to relate to society in terms of the progress that it has offered to people of color, black, other race
jazeera america launched a new and needed voice in journalism. the new york times calls it "serious, straight-forward news". "accurate, responsible" says the washington post. and the baltimore sun says, "instantly engaging and powerful". al jazeera america, there's more to it. make sure that stories don't escape them. >> every day a storm of views. how can you fully understand the impact unless you heard angles you hadn't considered. consider this, antonio mora brings you smart conversation that challenges the status quo. stories that matter to you. saudi arabia for that. ♪ test test .. . .. . but should you be made aware if you are consuming them. that's next on "consider this." welcome back to al jazeera. members of congress are being briefed right now about syria. >> possibly to start the end of this week, about now. now things look so very different. the loyal britt whose have stood by the americans in iraq, and afghanistan will not be onboard, this time. so obama has to decide, i think, whether to go it alone with perhaps the support of the french. and it looks like there
. on the record tracking town halls across america this week and this is new video out of dallas tonight where people on both sides of the issue are not happy. senator cruse joining jim demint sweeping across the nation. >> it is killing jobs and causing more and more people not to be hired. it is causing health insurance premiums to skyrocket. obama care was being debated, president obama promised the american people who said by the end of my first term, the average family's health insurance premiums will drop by $2500. >> after texas, senator ted cruse and former senator jim demint heading to florida, to tennessee, alabama, indiana and ohio and pennsylvania. you can see how many people are fed up. karl rove joins us. good evening, sir. >> good evening. >> i have to tell you that tonight what we're hearing out of dallas, there are protesters on both sides. the "washington post" saying hecklers confronting ted cruse at the town hall meeting and in response his people yelling usa, usa as the hecklers heckle him. this issue is not going away, is it? >> no. look, this very bad law with huge horri
, this point in time for america to start to lead -- this president to lead. to come before congress and get the approval of congress to do this, he should be able to make this case, i think if he tries to make it, he'll get the boot from congress. >> thank you for being with us. appreciate it, joining me with reaction to this developing story. ann coulter is with us. two big questions i have here. if they're not going for regime change, we have two big questions before us, number one, we have the israelis. now, if iran and syria are saying if they get a cruise missile attack, they're going to attack israel. is the president prepared to defend them? >> no. >> and number two. >> let's start with that one. >> wait a minute. we have to consider that. and what's the point then of lobbying missiles -- >> it's very depressing talking about foreign policy, whenever a democrat is president, because they don't care about america's national intraspective. that should be the only concern the man makes -- by the way, i don't think the president does have to go to congress to bomb someone. he's the comma
. >> democracy is at its best when they all have a seat at the table. but in america there's a big gap. we need more women in office. >> men hold 82% of the seats in the house of representatives. a decade ago, our nation ranked ninth 57 nations as a percentage of women in congress. today we are 92nd. out of 50 governors come just five are women. that's 10%, the same percentage as the number of women mayors in the 100 largest cities. out of more than 7000 state legislators, fewer than one in four are women. that's barely higher than it was two decades ago. at this rate women will be underrepresented in the united states for another 500 years. a century ago in 1920, the decades long struggle for women to win the righ right to vocal e in the 19th amendment to the constitution. inspired by that struggle, representation 2020 takes on this centrist challenge for women. we must have parity for women in office. that will happen when any given election a woman is just as likely as a man to win and in any given legislature, women will be just likely told them. i founded the white house project where we t
news at www.aljazeera.com [♪ music ] >> on america tonight. >> nothing today is more serious, and nothing is receiving more serious scrutiny. >> sharp words from washington leave little doubt what the u.s. thinks happened to these syrian victims. now focus turns to how and when the world will respond. >>> and the threat to california's most mighty residents. the enormous blazes that have also triggered fears for san francisco's water supply. also tonight we're keeping up the fight for chicago. a community left in a constant state of mourning and wondering how will the violence ever end? >> i'm so tired of doing funerals of young men getting killed through gun violence whether by th the police or anor gang. it just wears you down. [♪ music ] >> good evening, and welcome to america tonight. i'm ow joie chen. we start with a high stakes for the united states and the international community. it was these picture, gruesome, grizzly images, hundreds of men, women and children fell by something a week ago that has led increased pressure on damascus to explain and the european capi
. >> this international form cannot be violated without consequences. >> america's toughening position as secretary of state john kerry says the u.s. is now all but certain syria has resorted to using chemical weapons. >> new dangers as the nation's biggest forest fire now threatens thousands of buildings, water and energy sources and america's cherished trees. >> a senior muslim brotherhood leader accusing the military run government there are terrorism. >> the secret service agent grabbed her hand and the gun. >> this chilling flashback as former president gerald ford recounts an assassination attempt on his life 30 years ago. ♪ theme >> syria's foreign minister says a potential u.s. strike on syria would serve the interest of groups there in response to a chemical weapons attack that killed 355 people last week in damascus. in a speech moments ago, assad's second in command telling secretary of state john kerr we his regime has not gone against the u.n. investigation. >> it has said that the government used a chemical agent. i categorically deny to mr. kerry, i reiterate there is no single cou
far. >>> those are the headlines at that hour. "america tonight" is next on al jazeera. i'll see you back here at 11:00 eastern time, 8 pacific. ♪ >>> on "america tonight," building the case for action against syria, u.s. forces stand ready to go now what is next? >>> a spike in temperatures forces a time-out. the hid endangers for young athletes, and what can save them. >> we helped him up and started walking back to school, and the fell once again. >>> and timeless words scrawled on scraps, how the letter from birmingham jail lead to a revolutionary moment in american history. >> the letter was a call to the national conscious of america. ♪ >>> and good evening. thanks for being with us. i'm joie chen. a showdown looms with washington tonight that western powers are gearing up for some kind of military strike against the government of bashar al-assad. tell us what all of this means. and what is going to happen next? >> the white house insists that the president has not yet made a decision to go ahead with military strikes. you would not know that from the rhetoric with -- from
bombing bow- toy business. you will want to meet mo. america's news headquarters starts right now. hello, everybody. we begin with what has everyone talking this woke week. a global warning from the state department. two dozen consulates will be closed tomorrow because of a massive terrorist threat. some are questions about the timing and how the administration is handling this. molly is joining us live. >> president obama we are learning was briefed on the potential al-qaeda terrorist threat and there is two prongs of how the obama administration is handling the terror attack. warning all americans about international travel spectacularly in the midoast and north africa. and two embassies and consulates will close as a precaution. tomorrow is also president obama's birthday and the now president of iowa ran is supposed to be worn in. before the president left to play golf he got an update and he will get additional updates throughout the woke week. the embassies and consulates that will close will stretch from eastern africa to bangladesh. the u.s. picked up increased chatter that a ter
've heard this kind of talk before. but america is a different country. voters are rejecting 40 years of gop scare tactics. voters are supporting the obama administration's move to end severe mandatory sentences for low-level nonviolent drug offenders. of course, over at fox, they don't get it. >> they're not pot smokers. they're not pill poppers. >> wait a second. 50%. but the thing, what if the kid has a drug problem? >> then you get the kid to rehab or lock him in the basement or do what you have to do. that's what parents do. >> who thinks that one of these elderly people who have been in prison for a mandatory minimum sentence, that they're going to get out and they're not going to be on public assistance? of course they are. >> so we should keep people in prison to keep them off public aid? we should just lock up people with drug problems. this kind of demonizing and fearmongering is really nothing new for the right. it goes all the way back to president richard nixon. >> america's public enemy number one in the united states is drug abuse. in order to fight and defeat this enemy, it i
extinction. >> aljazeera turns to sports. components of the aljazz mission. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. >> we have been talking about syria all morning, but we have some developing news coming out of egypt. protests in support of ousted egyptian president mohamed morsi are taking plagues in the country. police have closed entrances into cairo and shut down metro stations in tahrir square to contain the protestors. flash style protests are being held in order to avoid fighting with police. >> eight years ago, hurricane katrina slammed into the gulf coast. more than 1800 people died in one of the worst natural disasters in this nations history. the city is still recovering. some very creative people have gone to the big easy to help drive its revival. >> he's come a long way since helping his father fix up houses in vermont. he's a respe
american community. liberalism nearly destroyed black america. now it's time for black america to return the favor. >> greta: hi specter. the growth at the gate. just me. >>> hello, eric bolling with kimberly guilfoyle, bob beckel, dana perino, and brian kilmeade. it is 5:00 in new york city. this is "the five." as the summer races forward, so does the race debate in america. stand your ground gave way to stop and frisk, now "the butler" hottest movie of the summer has a director that says america is more racist since president obama took office than before. more on that in a moment. first, we know the zimmerman trial ended weeks ago. i was stunned when i saw a brand new political attack ad which reenac reenacts the night trayvon martin crossed paths with george zimmerman. it is dramatic, provocative, is it fair. before we show the ad, we must warn you it is dramatic. beware if you have kids, especially younger kids watching. >> are you following him? >> yeah. >> okay, we don't need you to do that. >> okay. all right, sir, what is your name? >> george. >> he is yelling help? >>
black people but also white people. to know that a nation, such as america and the reason i struggle with it so hard because i really believe in the potential of this country. >> actor and civil rights activist harry boll phone -- belafonte. headline this morning the tallahassee democrat, a turning point and a quote from the mlk speech, i have a dream that this country will live out the true meaning of its creed that all men are created equal. our question as we begin on this wednesday morning, do marchs still make a difference? 202-585-3880 those of you under the and of 50. over 50, 202-585-3881. we begin with james joining us from grand fork, north dakota. caller: hey steve. calling again. i'm actually 49. right on the edge and i'm going to be 50. i'm not north dakotaian. i called before and i came out here for work for this hard to be a white man in suburbs of philadelphia. certain trades get displaced and you have to find your own way. i'm out here celebrating. i don't celebrate diversity. i noticed that c-span and msnbc there's an obsession with race. it's funny how white peopl
almost quite obviously referred to in that interview, if america's core national interests are at stake? >> let me go to paul, who is in capitol hill, and paul, of course, many members of congress back home on recess that's why they have this conference call, have you heard anything tonight? >> well, that's right. there is mounting frustration what we are hearing. mounting bipartisan frustration, they are worried that any attack can draw the u.s. further into the syrian conflict. and they are also frustrated about the lack of an end game. about a clear policy for a way out. >> paul, do we know anything about the briefing at the white house that they had with congress? have you hear anything about that. >> they have heard there are problems with that video conference. a problem securing enough video conference lines so the conference had to be declassified on ur classified report. president obama said it wouldn't be regime change or even changes the civil war. they are trying to keep it out of the hands of terrorists. >> we know the ashad regime maintains stock piles. we have indicated o
>>> good morning, america. breaking overnight. the president's tough words for syrian leader, bashar al assad, as u.n. inspectors prepare to leave syria, american warships move into position. the entire middle east bracing for an attack. and we're live from the region. >>> i wish to god these circumstances had been different. >> an abc news exclusive interview with george zimmerman's wife, speaking out for the first time about the night trayvon martin was shot. and the terrifying months in hiding with her husband. >>> breaking overnight. explosive allegations about nfl star aaron hernandez. was he using angel dust and carrying a gun at all times? now, big questions about how much patriots coach bill belichick really knew about his player's behavior. >>> shocking on the racetrack when a driver loses control. trapped him and engulfed in flames. how he walked away, racing in the same car just 30 minutes later. >>> and good morning, america. the crisis in syria continues to grow. so many developments right now, as that deadline looms for the u.n. inspectors to leave syria. there
are the headlines america tonight is next, i will see you back here at 11:00 eastern, and you can always find us on al jazeera.com. on america tonight. >> the nos have it. the nos have it. >> a raucous no vote in the british house of common moves president obama closer to a tough decision. will the u.s. go it alone? also tonight, a tough sell. is this the right time to buy real estate in bankrupt detroit? and the rebuilding of new orleans, the battle over who longs in the new new orleans. good evening, thank you for being with us. it was an absolutely gob smacker of a vote. one that quickly reverberate here in washington, and one that may force the hand of the u.s. president. late today the british parliament to be the step of saying no to prime minister it will not support british participation in a military strike against syria. the fierce response wasn't just a surprise, it was nearly unprecedented to a pettish leader seeking to support his american ally. >> the origin question was the motion on syria, and the use of chemical weaponed as published in corrected form, since when an amendment ha
saying bailout bevin calling this challenge a probailout kind of guy. is this good news for america? bad news for the republican party? both? the opposite? >> it's good news for the democratic party. if your enemy is committing suicide don't stop them and interrupt them. and the republicans are doing a nice job of taking themselves down. is it good for america? it is probably good for the america, if mitch mcconnell is the leader of the senate. but most americans don't care at all about what is happening in kentucky. but does mitch mcconnell move father and farther to the right than he already is, therefore giving the democrat a chance to win, or move to the middle, and risk losing his fight in his own republican party. >> david: paul ryan has said a government shutdown to defund obamacare, not good politics. others suggesting it is good politics. where do you come down on that and where do you think the country comes down on that? >> the republicans have got caught preaching one thing, and doing another. they say they want to cut the government, defund obamacare. paul ryan ran for vice
targets were in the arab world and in africa, there could also be attacks in europe or north america. now, if it is a global travel alert, then it isn't really a travel, but rather an existence alert. the public announcement had all the hallmarks of the old color-coded alerts of the bush era. threatening enough to make people anxious and vague enough to give them little to do about it. but what about al qaeda? well, al qaeda central, the organization centered in afghanistan and pakistan, is in fact battered and broke. but the idea of al qaeda remains vibrant in some other places. not, as it turns out, in the great hot beds of islamic radicalism such as saudi arabia, but rather in places where the government is so weak it simply cannot control its own territory. yemen, somalia, mali, northern nigeria. so what kind of strategy should the united states pursue against these very small groups in very weak states? there are three possible paths. the first would be a more full bore counterinsurgency strategy, the kind that general david petraeus executed in iraq and to a lesser degree in afghani
a massive outbreak of measles in america. well, some people are blaming some christian teachings. >>> and a montana teacher is convicted of raping a 14-year-old student. why did the teacher only get 30 days in jail? days in jail? >>> let's go "outfront." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >p >>> "outfront>>> "outfrn drumbep drumbeat to wdrurn drumbep drumbeat to wdrum louder. wall street suffered its worst day since june as the obama administration clearly laid the groundwork for a possible military strike on syria. >> there's no doubt who is responsible for this heinous use of chemical weapons in syria. the syrian regime. the president believes and i believe that those who use chemical weapons against defenseless men, women and children should and must be held accountable. >> market analyst todd schoenberger is "outfront" with us tonight. thank you for being here. how much of the drumbeat you heard from the vice president and the president and the administration about oil in the region? >> quite a bit because it's a grave concern for everybody at wall street. it was top of mi
from america and its allies is on the cards. we just don't know when it might come. but as syria's ambassador to the u.n. said the country right now is in a state of war and preparing for the worse. >> that's john terrett reporting. bam as der. when you look at that bam and when you, might that be the reason why there has been hesitancy to get involved with syria. >> i don't think so at all. i think that if the united states wished to apply direct military force to take out the syrian air force, for example, it could do so. we face terrorist threats were hezbollah and iran already, and yes, it can get worse, but at the same time i think we're facing those things already. the issue for the. >> obama: administration ifor ff the conflict. >> can you talk about the question of why chemical weapons have become the red line? thousands of people were killed in syria by the government already, we didn't take action. >> right. >> suddenly because chemical weapons are used we're taking action. what sense does that make? >> yes, it's an interesting point of view. my point of view is really
try to reset the and narrative -- reset the narrative, the idea that america is. . it is not broke. our priorities are broken. there is a misplaced obsession with debt and deficits as the national emergency of our time. that has driven the story line inside the beltway. we did a story on how the austerity cost rules washington. it is a portrait of think tanks, philanthropists and others who have framed in a way so it is hard to tell an alternative story. that has shifted a little because of new voices and forces emerging from the 99% or what ever you want to call it. >> you had better have twitter and facebook involved in the project. >> we do, absolutely. we have all kinds of new media. i agree you need to use all of that. it has been a very powerful force. we use all of that at "the nation. " we have a correspondent right about this in a politically. at occupy wall street in new york a few miles from our office, one thing that struck our correspondent was how many young people came to the square and were caught up in conversations, talking to people and the general assembly's, co
and what they did that they have not been able to do this two years. >> good morning, topping "america's money," traders hope today wall street will end the losing streak after the 6th straight day in the red shedding 100 points and slipped 4.5 percent from the record high on august 2. there is a surprising new survey of what happens to wedding gifts you give: 82 percent admit to selling some of the >> covering novato, oakland, sunnyvale and all the bay area, this is abc7 news. >> at 4:41 we look at the roof camera and you can see the ferry building to the left with all the weather details coming up. >> animal control will schedule a hearing next week to decide the fate of two pit bulls that attacked a 10-year old in antioch. friends and family and people who don't know hunter came out to raise money for his medical bills at a restaurant last night. they say the boy is doing well and recovering. one of the dogs that mauled hunter while plague at a neighbor's house was supposed to be put down yesterday but that didn't happen after the owners requested a hearing. that news was a let down
. highlights ahead in aljazeera america sports. mission. >> there's more to america, more stories, more voices, more points of view. now there's are news channel with more of what americans want to know. >> i'm ali velshi and this is "real money." this is "america tonight." sglovrjs our -- >> our news coverage reveal more of america's stories. was not me. check us out 24 hours a day on >> sentencing begins today for dr. nidal hasan, convicted last week for the 2009 shooting spree at ford hood that left 13 dead. thirty others were wounded in the deadly effort mass shooting ever on a military insulation. heidi zhou-castro joins us now. what can we expect in today's proceeding? >> well, morgan, today is day one of the prosecution's case for capital punishment. we know at least one family member of each of the 13 people killed by hassan will be taking the stand, plus three more of the wounded will be giving their testimony, bringing the total number of witnesses for the government to just around 20. the bigger question is what, if anything will hassan say when it's his turn. he did ask the judge f
of deciding to take a year au off instead. it is called a gap year. >> george: and some of america's top universities, hathey actually support it. not too long ago, i came across three teens who were on the global journey of a lifetime. this is the story of three 19-year-olds. ♪ >> george: who decided to live for almost a year outside their comfort zones. lady douglas is from amarillo, texas. >> god totally broke down every part of me, every inch of me. >> jesus, i thank you so much for this day. thank you so much for the way that you provided for us throughout this trip, god. >> kristin hendrix is from norman, oklahoma. >> i have grown up in a christian home and in a christian school, to where that is all i have been surrounded with. i wasn't able to truly make my faith my own. >> george: and kara crenshaw is from jackson, tennessee. >> after high school, i was kind of, like, tired of being in a classroom. you're in a classroom for 13 years, and you're expected to go to college right after that. i wanted to get out and see the world. >> george: the teenagers signed up with camp kegel,
do. there is this assumption that it's america's responsibility to make things better within egypt, within syria, i wish we could. i wish we could bring democracy together. it's a great mistake to think we have the power to do it, and instead we waste enormous amounts of money even trying. and also, there was movement on one issue, as rachel noted. immigration and that's because john mccain can count. every reasonable republican understands if they don't move on immigration, it's a political disaster. unfortunately, reasonable republicans are not anywhere near a majority in the house. >> let me ask you about that, it does feel to me like, i love that part of what the president is doing here is saying, you got an answer to this, go ahead and try. it also seems that the president's real challenge has been with these house republicans who won't even get in line with their own party leadership. does working with an elder like senator mccain make any difference in that kind of environment? >> unfortunately, probably not. by the way, we did get the confirmation tonight. and i think that'
can't be discouraged by what is, we've got to keep pushing for what ought to be. the america we ought to leave to our children, mindful that the hardships we face are nothing compared to those dr. king and his fellow marchers faced 50 years ago and that if we maintain our faith in ourselves and in the possibilities of this nation, there is no challenge we cannot surmount. >> joining me today, distinguished senior fellow, bob herbert, contributing editor for "rolling stone" and visiting scholar at nyu, eric bates. and congressional reporter, sahil kapur. joining me from washington is nbc justice correspondent pete williams. pete, you talked recently about the march on washington. why don't you tell us about that. >> reporter: washington, d.c., in the summer of 1963 was more than a little nervous about the prospect of a big civil rights march coming to the city, and that worry extended from the president on down, a fear that if it went badly, it could derail the efforts to pass the nation's most important civil rights law. ♪ it's easy to see now why the march on washington is celebrat
. we'll see you next week. >>> hello. glad you're with us and welcome to a new hour of america's news headquarters. >> good to see you all. topping the news this hour, thousands commemorating the march on washington ahead of the 50th anniversary of reverend dr. martin luther king jr.'s "i have a dream" speech. we're live at the national mall. >> we were up all night every night just wondering if it's going to come across the line and come toward us. >> home owners on edge as a massive wildfire burns out of control in yosemite national park. the latest on the efforts to beat back the flames. >> and the nsa getting a big endorsement after months of controversy over surveillance programs. we'll tell you who is now defending the embattled agency. >> we begin with a fox news alert out of our nation's capital, president obama holding an emergency meeting today with his national security team. it happened early this morning. on the disturbing reports of a chemical weapons attack in syria and while a u.s. military response is still anything but certain, there are already indications we may be
, of course, britain is america's biggest ally, so it's hard toss the u.s. would take an action without britain. also there's mounting pressure from members of congress. house speak john boehner sending a her to the president saying what do you want to accomplish with military action? so the momentum seems to have slowed, with the discussion behind the scene focusing on what would the legal justification be. >> we want to move on to richard engel. he's in ankara turkey. so what is the next move if the u.s. is to strike? so what is the next move if this does go forward? >> well, it really depends on if it goes forward and what exactly happens. the red cross today said it doesn't support an escalation that will only make a horrible humanitarian situation even worse. turkey absolutely wants military action to be taken against bashar al assad. he's making states like where is the world's humanity? how can they war crimes go unpunished? but his voice is not one we're hearing in unanimity. egypt has set it doesn't support, the arab league says it's not for military action. the u.n. wants to c
. >> reporter: have you and follow rebels damaged the special relationship with america? >> i think the special relationship is extremely strong. it will endure then , episode and people will find it refreshing that from time to time britain can stand up to the united states and say we are friends with you but on a candid basis and disagree with you on this issue. we are still friends and have a special relationship but not going to agree on everything. >> reporter: phillip conservative mp talking to me in westminster and thank you very much and back to you in doha. >> reporter: thank you for that, let's cross to paris and speak to jackie and the no votes we saw in the uk jackie, does that change france's will or decisions to act militarily on syria? >> well, not if you look at what the president has said and speaking to the newspaper on friday and he said the britain is a sovereign country and every right to take its own decisions but made it clear france would take the decisions and later on friday he will be having an in depth discussion on the phone with barack obama to talk about the way
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 624 (some duplicates have been removed)